Science and medical journals

Reviews of peer-reviewed and other significant articles in science and medical journals.

New papers by Morgan Carpenter on health and human rights

New papers by Morgan Carpenter on health and human rights

We are pleased to share current and recent peer-reviewed journal articles by co-executive director Morgan Carpenter, on intersex health and human rights, and an associated book chapter. The ‘normalization’ of intersex bodies and ‘othering’ of intersex identities In an open access peer-reviewed journal article and a book chapter, Morgan describes contradictions where medicine construct intersex…
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“Fixed at birth”, paper by Aileen Kennedy

UNSW Law Journal

With kind permission from both author and journal, we are pleased to share a paper by Aileen Kennedy entitled “Fixed at birth: Medical and legal erasures of intersex variations”, published earlier this year by the UNSW Law Journal. There is complicity between the medical and the legal construction of variations of sex development as pathological…
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Intersex human rights: addressing harmful practices and rhetoric of change

Reproductive Health Matters

OII Australia co-chair Morgan Carpenter has been published in the peer-reviewed scientific journal Reproductive Health Matters. Here is the article abstract: Intersex people and bodies have been considered incapable of integration into society. Medical interventions on often healthy bodies remain the norm, addressing perceived familial and cultural demands, despite concerns about necessity, outcomes, conduct and…
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Alice Dreger: Do you have to pee standing up to be a real man?

Alice Dreger: Do You Have to Pee Standing Up to Be a Real Man?

Alice Dreger, professor of clinical medical humanities and bioethics at the Northwestern University, USA, writes on hypospadias in Pacific Standard, The Science of Society: the simple idea that a real man has to pee standing up “has put a surprising number of babies under the knife”. Hypospadias is likely more common than widely understood: In…
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On the number of intersex people

This article reviews available data on the number of intersex people. It does not review legal sex assignments, gender identities or sexual orientations, and nor does it (or should it) define intersex in such ways. For information on the diverse ways in which people born with intersex traits understand our bodies, sexes and genders, these…
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The Advocate picks up on the foetal dex story; two issues not covered

The Advocate picks up on the foetal dex story; two issues not covered

The Advocate, in the US, has picked up on the story of how foetal dexamethasone is being used to prevent homosexuality and virilisation in CAH women. A new report details the dangerous experiementation that’s been going on in fetal engineering, in which doctors are using a synthetic steroid off-label to prevent lesbian, bisexual, intersex, and…
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“Out of Bounds? A Critique of the New Policies on Hyper­androgenism in Elite Female Athletes”

Katrina Karkazis, Rebecca Jordan-Young, Georgiann Davis and Silva Comporesi write in The American Journal of Bioethics on new IAAF/IOC policies on hyperandrogenism in female athletes: In May 2011, more than a decade after the International Association of Athletics Federations (IAAF) and the International Olympic Committee (IOC) abandoned sex testing, they devised new policies in response…
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“A medical condition is only as real as its definition”, Georgiann Davis on DSD in Sociology of Diagnosis journal

Sociologist Georgiann Davis Ph.D. recently had published her paper on DSD in Sociology of Diagnosis, Advances in Medical Sociology, Volume 12, 155–182. The paper, “DSD is a perfectly fine term”: Reasserting Medical Authority Through a Shift in Intersex Terminology is a hugely important critique and highly recommended reading. The context Even though the diagnosis carried…
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Psychology Today: Jesse Prinz on “Why Are Men So Violent?”

Jesse Prinz writes in Psychology Today on the subject of evolutionary biology. The article is refreshing in its rebuttal of gender essentialist arguments about human evolutionary psychology. A historical explanation of male violence does not eschew biological factors, but it minimizes them and assumes that men and woman are psychologically similar. Consider the biological fact…
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