Sex and gender recognition

Sex and gender recognition

We welcome new federal guidelines on sex and gender recognition

In 2003, the first Australian passport with an ‘X’ sex marker was issued to Alex MacFarlane, on the basis that Alex’s birth certificate, issued by the State of Victoria, showed no sex marker. Access was limited to people in the same circumstance, and only Victoria issues such certificates to intersex adults on request. In 2011,…
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Equal Rights Trust: Testimony by Gina Wilson on rights for intersex people

The UK’s Equal Rights Trust has just published testimony by OII Australia president, Gina Wilson, in The Equal Rights Review, Vol. 10. Gina talks about her personal background, her work as an activist, and the issues we face in seeking human rights, including intersex and the sex binary, the medical model, invisibility in human rights…
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Submission on government recognition of sex and gender

Parliament

This submission has been superseded by later policy, based on the 2013 Malta Declaration, a joint submission to the Attorney General’s Department on amending the guidelines, 2015 2017 Darlington Statement

Response to the ACT government on ‘Beyond the Binary’

Canberra

On 19 March, the government of the Australian Capital Territory published its response to “Beyond the Binary”, a report on legal recognition of “Sex and gender diversity” in the Territory. This is our formal reply to the government response. Download full document (PDF) We made a formal response to “Beyond the Binary” in July 2012….
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Public consultation on federal sex and gender recognition guidelines

The federal Attorney General’s Department has just launched a public consultation process on sex and gender recognition guidelines: 5. These Guidelines support the Australian Government’s introduction of legal protections against discrimination on the grounds of gender identity and intersex status in Commonwealth anti- discrimination law and recent changes to the Australian Government passport policy for…
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Ten years of ‘X’ passports, and no protection from discrimination

'X marks the spot' in the Western Australian newspaper, Perth 11 January 2003. Read at Bodies Like Ours

A note of caution: most people with intersex variations are simply men or women, with atypical sex characteristics. OII Australia acknowledges that people with intersex variations may be male, female, or identify with multiple or non-binary genders, just like other people. X passports are available not only to people with intersex variations, but also to…
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