News

Welcome!

Intersex people have innate sex characteristics that don’t fit medical norms for female or male bodies, and that create risks and experiences of stigma, discrimination and harm. We have many different kinds of bodies and life experiences.

Intersex Human Rights Australia is a national not-for-profit company by and for people with innate variations of sex characteristics. We were formerly known as OII Australia. We promote human rights, health and bodily autonomy. Our goals are to help create a society where intersex people are not stigmatised, and where our rights are recognised.
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Cody Smith

Welcoming Cody Smith

IHRA is delighted to share the appointment of Cody Smith as Senior Projects Officer, commencing on 1 August 2021. Cody brings a wealth of experience in training, communications and education, and they have been directly involved in community development work for many years in addition to support for parents, families and individuals.

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Vacancy: Administrator (part-time)

We have a vacancy for an administrator. This is a part-time role will provide office support and is vital for the smooth-running of the organisation. The administrator will undertake administrative tasks, ensuring other staff have adequate support to work efficiently. The application deadline is 28 July.

Resources

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Intersex for allies

How can you act as an ally to intersex people? This page contains introductory information and video resources.

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Bodily integrity

We all have a right to bodily integrity, to not be subjected to invasive or irreversible medical procedures that modify sex characteristics, unless necessary to avoid serious, urgent and irreparable harm.

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Intersex people and COVID-19

All populations that suffer health inequalities are disproportionately affected by COVID-19, and people with intersex variations are no exception.

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Discrimination

A briefing on discrimination issues affecting people with innate variations of sex characteristics due to our bodies, identities, or assumptions about our identities.

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An intersex flag

We have struggled with symbols used to denote intersex people, so Morgan created one that is free for the world to use.

Intersex in surveys and forms

Forms and data collection

Guidance on including people born with variations of sex characteristics in forms and other forms of data collection.

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Genomics and genetic selection

Many intersex traits are genetic, with an identified origin. The elimination of such traits from the gene pool is an established and growing phenomenon.

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Clinical guidelines

Are clinical guidelines enough to eliminate human rights violations against intersex people in medical settings? Reviewing the evidence, we believe they are inadequate, and their prerequisites do not exist.

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Healthcare pathways

These health and wellbeing resources work together to visually map established healthcare needs and highlight potential gaps in services.

Identification document

Identification documents

A briefing and guidance on understanding and respecting the diverse sex classifications and gender identities of people with intersex variations.

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Inclusive practice

Guides to inclusive practice, to help make your service, program or project intersex-friendly.

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Intersex people and intersectionality

The rights and concerns of intersex people overlap and intersect with the rights and concerns of women, LGBT people, and disabled and racialised peoples.

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Media and style guide

If you are writing about intersex people, our bodies, identities and human rights concerns, this page outlines why we use words the way we do.

Intersex for parents.

Intersex for parents

This page is for new parents of an intersex child, prospective parents planning a pregnancy or undergoing genetic or preconception screening, and also parents of older children.

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Intersex population figures

There are no firm population figures for people with intersex variations, due to stigma, misconceptions, lack of accurate recording of data, arbitrary definitions, and ideological values.

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Sport

A briefing on issues affecting people with innate variations of sex characteristics in sport settings.

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What is intersex?

A briefing on working, Australian and international definitions of intersex.

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Workplaces

Guidance for employers, union representatives and staff on intersex issues and inclusion in the workplace.

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Youth

Finding out you have an intersex variation can be a surprise! It doesn’t mean you’re alone. There are heaps of us out here with different intersex variations.

Community declarations

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Joint statement on the International Classification of Diseases 11

Declaración conjunta sobre la Clasificación Internacional de Enfermedades 11 / Совместное заявление о Международной классификации болезней 11 / Déclaration commune sur la Classification Internationale des Maladies 11 / 關於針對國際疾病分類第11版(ICD-11)的聯合聲明 / 关于针对国际疾病分类第11版(ICD-11)的联合声明

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Affirm the Darlington Statement

Following the second Australian-Aotearoa/NZ intersex advocacy retreat, we invite you and your organisations to affirm the Darlington Statement in support of intersex human rights.

Darlington retreat

Darlington Statement

The Darlington Statement is a joint consensus statement by Australian and Aotearoa/New Zealand intersex organisations and independent advocates, agreed in March 2017. It sets out the priorities and calls to action by the intersex human rights movement in our countries.

Participants at the Third International Intersex Forum in Malta

Malta Declaration

Between 29 November and 1 December 2013, the Third International Intersex Forum, supported by ILGA and ILGA-Europe, took place in Valletta, Malta. The event brought together 34 activists representing 30 intersex organisations from all continents, and produced a common declaration.