Our work

Welcome!

Intersex people are born with physical sex characteristics that don’t fit medical norms for female or male bodies. We have many different kinds of bodies and life experiences.

Intersex Human Rights Australia is a national not-for-profit company by and for people born with variations of sex characteristics. We were formerly known as OII Australia.

We promote human rights and bodily autonomy. Our goals are to help create a society where intersex bodies are not stigmatised, and where our rights as people are recognised. We build community, evidence, capacity, and education and information resources. Our two part-time staff are funded by foreign philanthropy.
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Steph Lum, speaking at Women Deliver 2019

Steph Lum at Women Deliver 2019

Women Deliver 2019 conference is described by the organisers as the “world’s largest conference on gender equality and the health, rights, and wellbeing of girls and women”. It has brought together speakers from around the world, including national leaders, health and legal experts, and advocates. We are proud that co-chair Steph Lum has participated in…
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World Health Organization logo

Joint statement on the International Classification of Diseases 11

Declaración conjunta sobre la Clasificación Internacional de Enfermedades 11 / Совместное заявление о Международной классификации болезней 11 / Déclaration commune sur la Classification Internationale des Maladies 11 / Dichiarazione comune sulla classificazione internazionale delle malattie 11 / 關於針對國際疾病分類第11版(ICD-11)的聯合聲明 / 关于针对国际疾病分类第11版(ICD-11)的联合声明 / Yhteislausunto kansainvälisestä tautiluokituksesta ICD-11 / Wspólne oświadczenie w sprawie Międzynarodowej Klasyfikacji Chorób 11 (ICD11)

A joint statement by more than 60 intersex-led organisations and groups to the World Health Organization.

World Health Organization logo

Media statement – International Classification of Diseases 11 and intersex people

More than 50 intersex-led organisations and groups from every region of the world have signed a joint statement to the World Health Organization condemning the repathologisation of intersex variations as “disorders of sex development” in the WHO International Classification of Diseases 11 (ICD-11), and medical classifications that promote early surgical intervention to “fix” intersex bodies….
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IDAHOBIT logotype, white text on black

IDAHOBIT statement, 2019

Today is International Day Against Homophobia, Transphobia, Biphobia and, in recent years, discrimination against intersex people. The event marks the anniversary of the partial depathologisation of homosexuality by the World Health Organisation, that is, the removal of homosexuality from the International Classification of Diseases. We recognise the importance of this event to people who are…
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"The unrelenting gaze 1978-2019", an image by South African art collective xcollektiv

CAS decision on Caster Semenya: This is what injustice looks like

The Court of Arbitration for Sport has issued a press release outlining a majority decision against Caster Semenya and Athletics South Africa in their case with the IAAF. Caster Semenya is a Black South African cisgender woman, born with a variation of sex characteristics, seeking to compete in the sex category she was assigned at…
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Community declarations

Darlington 2 retreat participants

Affirm the Darlington Statement

Following the second Australian-Aotearoa/NZ intersex advocacy retreat, we invite you and your organisations to affirm the Darlington Statement in support of intersex human rights.

Darlington retreat

Darlington Statement

The Darlington Statement is a joint consensus statement by Australian and Aotearoa/New Zealand intersex organisations and independent advocates, agreed in March 2017. It sets out the priorities and calls to action by the intersex human rights movement in our countries.

Participants at the Third International Intersex Forum in Malta

Malta Declaration

Between 29 November and 1 December 2013, the Third International Intersex Forum, supported by ILGA and ILGA-Europe, took place in Valletta, Malta. The event brought together 34 activists representing 30 intersex organisations from all continents, and produced a common declaration.